Strength of Cyaktiógya

Text of the Marker: Strength of Cyaktiógya

The part of the story installed here:

Strength of Cyaktiógya

In Kcymaerxthaereal times, the island we call Luzon, known in that time as Cyaktiógya (pronounced CHYAK-tee-ehg-yah—they had very different words back then!), was actually quite a bit bigger and, like many islands, had a quality called anggroav—a tendency to be its own universe. This troubled Kmpass, the Urgend God of Directionality, the one who was always trying to make the world too simple and make everything the same. He decided to destroy Cyaktiógya—he would roll the island up into a tiny ball the size of a grain of sand and discard it into his desert. So Kmpass searched for weakness, a way to unravel the island’s majesty.

Kmpass noticed that many of the locals had forgotten Cyaktiógya’s deeply interwoven beauty—forgotten its many creatures: magnificent birds like the Yaarayehyay, the clever Xthaedransg, the beautiful feltep, even a type of Tlapak—creatures so silly you might literally dissolve into laughter when you watched them. When Kmpass stood on this spot, intent on his prize, the island itself knew his light tread was a trick and called out for help. Children and the young of all kinds of creatures knew exactly what to do. They began to draw, depicting the wonders of the island and the stories of the xthaere so purely the ground looked almost like a window. Seeing this complexity scared Kmpass, so much that he recoiled at the richness of this place and returned to his underwater desert home. Though the victory was in one sense fleeting, it was worthy and even today, children of this area honor it from time to time by making their own drawings. The fact those new images eventually wash away reminds us all to never take for granted the richness of our worlds.